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John Daniel Frederick
BUSCH
in
North America

Rodney J. Busch

Contents
J.D.F.Busch
Germany
America
York & Markham
Kingston
Wolfe Island
Appendix A Published Sources
Appendix B Newspaper Articles
Appendix C Public Records
Notes
Sources
 
Forward
This is intended to be a short history of Frederick Busch and not an extensive genealogy of him or his descendants. I will leave that to others who may be interested in undertaking that much greater task.
I would like to thank Susan E. MacDonald for the invaluable information that she provided which made much of this work possible.
R.J.B. July, 1998


John Daniel Frederick Busch

Germany-

On May 2, 1792, the 49 ton brigantine Catharina with 134 passengers on board left the Danish port city of Altona (now a district of Hamburg, Germany) and set sail for the North American continent. It was picking up the remaining passengers for a voyage that started out of Hamburg, Germany but really began eight months earlier in Britain.

On September 8, 1791, William Berczy, a German born artist, signed an agreement with a group of British land speculators to form the Genesee Association, a company that would procure settlers for a tract of land that they owned west of Philadelphia. “The contract offered prospective emigrants small farms of 25 acres which would be operated on a ‘share crop’ basis for six years.” [1] After farming for six years each tenant would be entitled to buy the land at a reduced market price. Among those who signed on with Berczy were two young, illiterate Prussians, the Busch brothers Friedrich and Wilhelm. [2]

Johann Daniel Friedrich Busch was born near Lagendorf in the Prussian province of Brandenburg on August 16, 1773; his older brother Johann Christian Wilhelm was born February 4, 1767. Their parents were Joachim Wilhelm & Christina Elizabeth Busch. [3]

Friedrich and Wilhelm would leave their homeown and travel 400 kilometers north to Hamburg and the port city of Altona to join with William Berczy’s association to emigrate to North America.
 

Berczy had hired two ships, the Catharina and the Heinrich and Georg, to transport the prospective settlers to North America, but he soon found himself in trouble with the German government. Emigration by individuals was allowed, but the organized emigration of large groups of people had been prohibited by the Senate of Hamburg since 1753. People were easy prey for unscrupulous emigration agents who “sold” them by the shipload to various traders; those who survived the voyages ended up as indentured servants in America.  
Riverside view of Altona
A manoeuvre would be needed to evade the Senate’s prohibition.

A third ship was set up as a decoy flying the American flag. While it was being inspected by the Prussian Ambassador (looking for illegal emigrants), the fully loaded Catharina, under the Danish flag, left the harbour of Hamburg and sailed for Altona. By the time the Hamburg Senate had finally decided to deal with the matter by renewing their mandate against emigration dealers, Friedrich and Wilhelm, along with their fellow passengers on board Catharina, were sailing through the English Channel on their way to begin a new life in the wilderness settlements of North America.
[4]

On board the Catharina were the single men and women, along with married couples and children. John Andre, in his book William Berczy Co-founder of Toronto, describes the adventure of the ocean crossing:

Provisions for four months had been packed in the hold … such as salted pork and beef, peas, barley, sauerkraut, cheese, butter and biscuits. Beer, tea and water ended the list to which were added some fresh fish caught from the ocean… The gentle weather and the breeze gusting from the right direction seemed to promise a pleasant and reasonably short voyage. Her sails bulged, the little ship advanced “like an arrow” and reached the ocean proper in six days… The passengers were kept busy with games and labour,
except for the seasick who were consoled with special refreshments by Mrs.Berczy… The ship was scrubbed and fumigated with juniper berries and vinegar twice weekly and passengers were ordered to stay on deck as long as possible…
The first bad omen came with the hot weather which turned the beer sour. The sun, which a few days earlier had mildly warmed the air, now converted the area below the deck into an oven… Meanwhile, the Catharina stood still, her sails limp. There was not even a slight breeze to ruffle her canvas because Captain Trautmann had apparently steered the ship too far south… The heat had made the barrels containing fresh water leaky… [The foreman], Helmke discovered a hollow sound in all but one of the supposedly full containers. Berczy… ordered the Captain to change course at once and head northwards. Upon Trautmann’s refusal, our calm hero, like a born general, took out his watch and granted the stubborn navigator exactly ten minutes. If he did not follow his instructions in the allotted time, he would be locked up and Berczy would take command of the ship. After ten minutes of cursing and threatening, the Captain surrendered. As if by the will of the Almighty, Catharina’s sails billowed with wind again as they approached the coast of New England… After six hours of hoping and watching, the cry of “land!” came from the youngster atop the mast… Catharina was nearing the coast of Newport, Rhode Island.
On July 28, 1792, [the] Catharina arrived in Philadelphia and the settlers officially left the ship which had been their crowded home for thirteen weeks, on August 3.[5]

America-

From Philadelphia, in twelve covered wagons, they headed for Northumberland, Pennsylvania. From there they would have to build a road to the settlement area in the Genesee Tract in western New York state. They would have to carve a road, passable for their wagons, through virgin forest and, what would prove to be even more difficult, partly along the slopes of the Allegheny Mountains. One difficult stretch of only a few miles took several weeks to complete. The road that they built is now part of the Susquehanna Trail.[6]

Captain Charles Williamson had recently founded the village of Williamsburg in the Genesee, and he, along with some axemen, arrived to assist the settlers in building the remainder of the road (after the most difficult part had been done). He, like Berczy, had been contracted to bring settlers to the area—in his case Highland Scots. Berczy maintained that he had “exclusive right” to settle 110,000 acres of land in the Genesee.[7] Williamson insisted that this exclusive right had expired and claimed the land for himself. He tried to break up Berczy’s settlers in order to get more people for his land and eventually succeeded in getting four families to go to one of his settlements. Berczy finally managed to get some land for his German settlers, and after Christmas, 1792, they “moved out in groups of six to build their little cabins in two villages.”[8] This included houses for the bachelors and artisans. The houses were 24 by 16 feet and had the luxury of wooden floors. One of the Busches was listed as an “ordinary baker” at this settlement.[9]

But the settlement here was not a peaceful one. After threats from Williamson, the sheriff, acting under Williamson’s direction, arrested some of the settlers. Court action by Berczy resulted in their release, but he realised that his Germans would have to find another place to settle. In 1792, Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe had distributed in the United States a proclamation concerning free grants of land to prospective settlers in Upper Canada. Simcoe wanted to settle the “huge territory west of Kingston” that settlers from Britain considered to be “too far out of the way.”[10] Meetings between Simcoe’s representatives and Berczy resulted in agreements to acquire land suitable for his settlers: 64,000 acres “in back of York [Toronto]” called Markham Township.[11]

Williamson’s magistrate had prohibited the settlers from leaving the area and had the Sheriff’s men patrolling the lakeshore. Berczy already had boats, barges and wagons ready, waiting for his orders. In the early morning hours of April 15, 1794, Berczy, along with three assistants, crossed the Genesee River at Hartford and followed an Indian path through the wilderness. They reached the Queenston Ferry in Niagara, Upper Canada the next day. “Berczy reinforced his little flotilla by hiring fifteen boats at Niagara, each manned by three armed oarsmen. Twenty-five young settlers obtained guns and Joseph Brant supplied over a dozen braves.”[12] Berczy’s plan worked: the Indians, some armed oarsmen and some of the sturdier peasants split into groups to divert the sheriff and cover the retreat of the women and children (along with their baggage) to Irondoquoit Bay where boats were waiting for them. The men made their way overland to Queenston; the flotilla arrived there “between the 20th and 25th of June, 1794.”[13]

Of the original group of prospective settlers that left Germany with Berczy just over two years before, 220 or about three-quarters of them, including the Busch brothers, had made it this far.[14] By the end of August, all the healthy men along with 16 hired axemen from Niagara moved to York.

York & Markham-

The site which would become the York settlement and later the city of Toronto was described in one report that in 1793 the spot contained “only one solitary Indian Wigwam.”[15]

On September 6, 1794, Abraham Iredell was ordered by the German Company (as Berczy’s association at York was called) to lay out the concessions with 200 acre lots in Markham. The settlers had to live in York temporarily and the Busch brothers found work there as bakers at the German Company office. By November, a partial survey was completed and the settlers made roads to and within Markham; they would now be able to determine the location of their lots.[16] Frederick and William (their names now anglicized) were granted lots 13 and 14 respectively on the fifth concession.[17]

It was not until the winter of 1794-5 that they finally established themselves on their own land in Markham. One of the Busches is listed among a group of men who helped bring up the rest of the provisions from York that would be needed to hold them through the winter. In January, barrels of pork, flour, salmon, salt, rum, mill irons, nails, etc. along with the settlers baggage were transported by sleigh to Markham. Their oxen had to haul two dozen loads, weighing 800 to 900 pounds each, up the hills of Young Street in trips that would take at least a day.[18]

The crops failed in the first full year of settlement, 1795, and the settlers were reduced to “meagre rations of potatoes and turnips.”[19] Dozens of the settlers in Markham searched for food and work in York, but the only work available was cutting cordwood. Berczy used his houses and mills as bond to borrow meat, peas and rice from the army warehouse. He again “had to buy thread to mend the rags of the settlers” with his own money.[20] The famine resulting from the crop failure devastated the settlement of York-Markham in that winter of ’95-’96; a few died and about one-third of the people moved back to Niagara.

It was probably around this time that William Busch died since his name is absent from the 1797 census. His death may have been caused by the toil of clearing roads, the harsh living conditions or the recent outbreak of malaria with which Berczy himself became afflicted. Of heads of families alone, ten (including William) had died before 1804. Frederick inherited his brother’s land.[21]

Despite being owners of large areas of land, perhaps it was too much to expect bakers (who had probably lived in a town or village) to become pioneer farmers. Frederick was invited by Secretary John Small to open a bakery in York.[22] He petitioned for a town lot in York on January 2, 1798 for the purpose of setting up the baking business and was granted one that same year.[23]

He was now an established businessman in York and the owner of 400 acres of property in Markham. After having spent the past six years in temporary settlements that only lasted a few weeks or months—Philadelphia, Northumberland, Williamsburg, Queenston—Frederick now had what looked like a permanent home in his new country. Yet he probably left York in late 1798 or early 1799.[24] Why would he leave everything to start anew in another settlement?

One answer may be, as John Andre speculates in his history of Toronto, that the bachelors who left Markham permanently may have done so “because of the lack of prospective brides in ‘the rear of Toronto.’”[25] So, off he went to the chief settlement in Upper Canada: Kingston.

Kingston-

The young settlement of Kingston, the “largest town in Upper Canada”, to which Frederick arrived had only been laid out in 1783 and had a population of around 500.[26] In April, 1800, Frederick petitioned for a town lot. Leading citizens of Kingston certified him to be “an industrious tradesman and a quiet peaceable inhabitant.”[27] Frederick stated that he had resided in Upper Canada for at least 6 years and the petition was approved in February 1801.[28] In the same year, he joined the Masonic lodge in Kingston and over the next few years he held prominent positions, being twice elected to the position of a principal officer (J.W. & W.M.). When a loan from the lodge was requested by him it “was unanimously granted by show of hands.”[29] He may have wanted the money to help start up his bakery business on one of the two lots he received on Queen and Barrack Streets.[30] He later sold these and moved to a new location on what is now Brock Street between Wellington and King.

It is in the records for the sale of his property that his name first appears as John Daniel Frederick.[31]

Frederick married Phoebe Mosher (Mosier) and together they had eleven children, seven girls: Mary, Elizabeth, Hannah, Christina, Mary Isabella, Jane and Esther Ann, and four boys: John William, John Henry, Frederick and George.

In 1807 Phoebe received a grant of 200 acres of land in Loughborough Township for being a child of a United Empire Loyalist, Lewis Mosher.[32] (He was married to Mary Freeman who was the daughter of John Freeman of Freeman’s Farm, site of a decisive battle during the American Revolutionary War).[33] Phoebe’s land grant also indicates that Frederick Busch’s occupation is a baker. In that year Frederick sold the lot he had originally been allocated in Markham Township but retained the one he inherited from his brother, William.[34]

Despite being a young settlement, Kingston was not an untamed frontier town: there was a local militia to maintain law and order and till 1824 there were stocks and a whipping post in the Market Square. The local regulations even extending to the proper installation of stove pipes within dwellings and, being a baker, Frederick would have certainly been affected by laws enacted to regulate the weight and price of bread.[35]

One of the petitions that Frederick signed was a refusal to further accept for payment a particular coin, the “Brock copper,” that was then in circulation. Apparently there were excessive numbers of these as well as other copper coins and some people would not accept large numbers of them as payment. The petition describes a typical situation that would have directly affected him: when “the poor day labourer… goes with them to the baker to solicit from him a little bread… to relieve the hunger of his family; he there meets with a positive denial, (for the baker cannot buy flour with coppers).”[36]

In 1806 and 1807, Frederick served four times on a jury. The cases involved: an attempt to persuade a soldier to desert, the stealing of two watches, grand larceny, and a misdemeanour.[37] With each trial served, Frederick rose in position on the jury, from 12th (i.e., last) to 2nd place. This may have been an indication of his competence as a juror and may have benefited him when seeking public office. In 1809, Frederick was elected a constable for the Crown in Kingston.[38]

By 1817, Kingston was a well established settlement with a population of 2,250 and 450 houses. There were three churches, a theatre, a public library, sixty-seven shops and a newspaper.[39]

It was probably around the years 1818-19 that Frederick and his family moved to Wolfe Island. His son, John (whether it was Henry or William is not clear), stated in court testimony in March of 1864 that he had lived on Wolfe Island for about 45 or 46 years.[40] In 1820 Frederick sold the lot in Markham Township he had inherited from his brother.[41] By early 1822 another baker had set up a business at Frederick’s house on Market (Brock) St. and he sold that lot in 1823.[42]

Wolfe Island-

Wolfe Island was first settled just before the turn of the 18th century by 15 families brought there by the owners of the island who purchased it in 1795. Among that group were three sons of Lewis Mosher, father of Phoebe.[43] Settlement increased in the 1820s and 30s, and by 1826 the population was 276. The island was covered with forest so it is not surprising that the typical house was a log cabin. Most settlers leased their land because they were too poor to buy.[44]

In January, 1825 Frederick was elected a Road Master on the island.[45] Other than being elected Road Master, there is no other record concerning Frederick Busch on Wolfe Island, of his occupation or where he lived.

Their daughter, Elizabeth,[46] who was married to Jacob Smith, drowned off Wolfe Island, as reported in The Kingston Chronicle:

Melancholy Accident.- We are sorry to learn that on Wednesday afternoon last [February 28, 1827], Mrs. Jacob SMITH, of [Wolfe] Island, and her daughter, a child of two years old, were drowned under the following circumstances:- It appears that Mr. Smith was about changing his residence to a place three miles further up the Island: and on the afternoon of Wednesday, Mrs. Smith, her two children, and her brother Wm. [John William Busch], proceeded on the ice in a sleigh, which contained several articles of furniture, to the new residence. In passing along the Batteau channel they came to bad ice, which giving way, the horses and sleigh got into the water; but Mrs. Smith succeeded in getting out with her children. She did not proceed far, however, when the ice gave way under her, and she and her little daughter sunk to rise no more. [Busch], who ran to the assistance of his sister, with great difficulty was able to save one of the children, a little boy, who, we understand, is doing well. Mrs. Smith was daughter of Mr.Frederick [Busch], of [Wolfe] Island; was about 26 years of age, and at the time of her death far advanced in pregnancy.[47]

Hannah married George Horne of Simcoe Island on April 13, 1826.[48]

John William married Margaret Bennett on November 29, 1831; she died May 20, 1832 and is buried on Wolfe Island.

At that time, the death of women shortly after marriage was often a result of complications in pregnancy or childbirth, which may have been the case for Margaret Bennett; but there is another possible cause. In both 1832 and 1834 there were severe visitations of Asiatic cholera in Canada. “In 1834, out of a population of 5,000 there were 300 deaths” in Kingston from it.[49]

John Henry married Arabella Hinckley July 5, 1831 (who died, June 13, 1843); his second marriage was to Sarah Anne Ellerbeck, February 28, 1844.[50]

Christina married Jeremiah Orser, July 3, 1831.[51]

Mary Isabella married George Snider.[52]

Frederick Jr. married Julia Turcotte, August 10, 1841; he later married Jane Anne Eves, November 21, 1865.

Jane married Gabriel Orser, June 23, 1841.[53]

George (my great-great grandfather) married Frances Eves (sister of Jane Ann, above) and they lived on Wolfe Island.

Esther Ann married Samuel Mosher, her first cousin. His father was Nicholas Mosher, Phoebe’s brother.[54]

There is no record of the death of John Daniel Frederick, but he probably died between 1842 and 1851. His signature appears on a petition dated September 26, 1842, and he does not appear on the 1851 census whereas Phoebe does living with Frederick Jr. and family.[55]

Phoebe died on March 29, 1854 and was buried in the Trinity Anglican Cemetery on Wolfe Island.[56]


Prologue

It is interesting that there is so much public information on Frederick Busch. This was a time when average citizens (many of them illiterate) would leave few records of the events in their lives. His involvment in the settlement of York and Markham with William Berczy is responsible for so much being known of the life of one illiterate immigrant baker. Other references found in public records resulted from him establishing himself as a businessman and being involved in public affairs: a Constable, Freemason, Roadmaster, frequent juror, and signatory to many published petitions relating to public matters. It helped being among a small population and having newspapers that reported so much on local events.

In an entry in the 1871 census for Wolfe Island (according to Susan MacDonald), Frederick’s son, John Busch, under the section for ancestry, wrote “Prushen” and then crossed it out and wrote “English.”[57]


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Appendix A

Published Sources


The following are excerpts from the two main sources of information on Frederick Busch prior to his arrival in Kingston: Infant Toronto as Simcoe’s Folly and William Berczy Co-founder of Toronto, both by John Andre. The remaining excerpts are from other sources referring to Frederick Busch or his immediate family.

Infant Toronto as Simcoe’s Folly. John Andre, Toronto, Centennial Press, 1971.

p38
“[In 1794] William Berczy, Pastor George Sigmund Liebich, Philip Eckhardt, Frederick Busch, William Busch, Dederic Banse, John Gottlieb Wichur, Mrs. Wichur, and John Ulsen made up the staff of the Toronto office, warehouse, and kitchen of the German Company, of which persons the Busch brothers were bakers, John Wichur a shoemaker, and John Ulsen a tailor.

p51
“During January [1795] Dalson (or Dolson), a member of a prominent family of the Niagara area, with his friend Martin Freund (or Friend) and numerous other drivers, hauled on sleighs the remaining barrels of pork, flour, salmon, salt, rum, settlers baggage, mill irons, boxes of nails etc. from the town [York] to Markham. In this crash transportation program of at least two dozen loads participated with their sleighs and oxen Disher,… Phillips, and Berczy’s settlers Quantz, Dietzmann, Rumohr, Meissner, Busch, Banse and Sommerfeldt. Oxen could haul up the hills of Young Street a sleigh loaded with three or four barrels of goods weighing about 800-900 pounds, taking a day or more to reach Markham.

p96
“Among the suddenly swollen number of people in the York-Markham area in September, 1794, totalling to about three hundred souls with the odd settlers on Young Street and on the Humber and Don Rivers… Peter Pining owned the first brewery in Toronto, Frederick Busch and John Matchefsky two of the earliest bakeries.

p129
“Including William Busch, whose farm was inherited by his brother Frederick, ten family heads had passed away up to 1804.

p130
“Included in this [departure] of twenty two persons,… were… Peter Pining, the first brewer of Toronto, Frederick Busch, the Toronto baker,… and Berczy’s tragic Lutheran Pastor George Sigmund Liebich.

p191
“Appendix V. Settlers in Markham Township, 1804.[Land Registry records] Fifth Concession…

[Lot]
 
13 Frederic [sic] Busch. abs[ent] [Drawn] 1794
14 Frederic [sic] Busch. inherited of his Brother William who drew it 1794

p202
"SIGNATURES OF PEASANTS…"

p213 [footnote for above] “201 1: Signatures of Markham peasants from 1793 in Williamsburg, New York, op. cit., our note 50, 22. [The signatures beside each X appear to be of the same hand, which would indicate someone else signed for their Xs]

p207 [cit.] “50 22: Original signatures of German settlers, … The Public Archives of Canada, William Berczy Papers (M.G. 23, H II, 6, Volume 1, pp. 50, 51)

*    *    *    *    *

William Berczy Co-founder of Toronto. John Andre, Toronto, Borough of York, 1967.

p50
“In Williamsburg… John Lindemann was one of the blacksmiths; Peter Pining filled the position of brewer; Matchefsky a sugar baker, and Sommerfeldt and Busch ordinary bakers.

p154
[Source for above] “170. Genesee Journal [op. cit.], p.242-243.
[cit.] “36. Berczy’s “Genesee Journal” (A.J.H. Richardson and Helen I. Cowan ‘William Berczy’s Williamsburg Documents’, in the Rochester Historical Society, Publications xx, Rochester, 1942, pages 141-265).

p51
“Peter Pining was induced by Secretary Small to erect a Brewing House in York; Matchefsky and Busch bakeries.

p154
[Source for above] “176. Ontario Department of Lands and Forests, Surveyors Letters, Chewett, 1797-1802, pages 21 and 36. ‘Peter Pind (=Pining) has built on lot 8 on the north side of Dutchess Street’, etc; page 148 (=Matchefsky [& Busch?]).

*    *    *    *    *

William Berczy. Florence M. Burns, Don Mills, Fitzhenry & Whiteside Ltd., 1977

p48       “[In Markham] the Busch brothers had set up a bakery…

*    *    *    *    *

Pennsylvania German Pioneers: A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808. Vol.III. Ralph B. Strassberger, ed. William J. Hinke. Norristown, PA, Pennsylvania Historical Society Pub., 1934. (Squared brackets in original.)

p50
A List of the People in the Ship Catharina. Capt Hendrick Trautman, sailing from Hamburg, destined for Philadelphia, with Cabin Passengers. [August 3d 1792.]… Busch and brother…

*    *    *    *    *

The Town of York 1793-1815: A Collection of Documents of Early Toronto. Edith G. Firth, Toronto, The Champlain Society, 1962.

p89-90
“List of the Inhabitants of the Township Of York and it’s [sic] Vicinity In the Year 1797-… Single Men in York… Fridk.[sic] Bush40
40 Frederick Busch (Bush) was one of the Berczy settlers in Markham Township.

*    *    *    *    *

The History of Freemasonry in Canada: From Its Introduction in 1749. J.Ross Robertson, Toronto, The Hunter, Ross Co. Ltd., 1899, V.1 Ch.26

p588
1809… on the 3rd of August, “Bro. Frederick Bush petitioned to the lodge for the loan of seven pounds, ten shillings, which was unanimously granted by show of hands.”

p601
LISTS OF MEMBERS OF ST.JOHN’S LODGE, NO.6, KINGSTON, 1795.1821… 1800… a.Frederick Bush… 1813. a.Frederic [sic] Bush…

p602
1816… a.John Mosier

p603
ROLL OF PRINCIPAL OFFICERS…
JUNE, 1807… Fred. Bush [J.W.]…
DEC.,… [Fred. Bush][J.W.]…
JUNE, 1808… Fred. Bush [W.M.]…
DEC.,… [Fred. Bush][W.M.]

[J.W.= Junior Warden; W.M.= Worshipful Master]

*    *    *    *    *

The Loyalists In Ontario: The Sons and Daughters of The American Loyalists of Upper Canada. W.D.Reid, New Jersey, Hunterdon House 1973.

p230
Mosher, Lewis of Landsdowne, m. Mary dau John Freeman     See OC 26 Aug 1835
Phoebe, m. Frederick Bush of Town of Kingston OC 4 July 1807
Lewis of Wolfe Island OC 28 Oct. 1835
Nicholas of Wolfe Island OC 8 Dec 1835

[“OC” refers to Order in Council. These were orders concerning land grants made by the government to the sons and daughters of U.E.L.s when they came of age or married. R.J.B.]

*    *    *    *    *

Kingston Before the War of 1812. ed.R.A.Preston, The Champlain Society, 1959.

p280b
PROPRIETORS… Numbered Lots… 226.227. Fredk Buck [sic]. [On map lots 227 & 226 are in the middle of the block on the north side of Queen St. between Rear (now Bagot) and Quarry (now Wellington) Streets.]
[Click on map to enlarge.]
 

p353-4
I11 Memorial: “The Inhabitants of Kingston Upper Canada Praying the removal of an [sic] Hospital” [P.A.C., C514, PP.126.8v].

Kingston, 24th March, 1809
To His Excellency Sir James Craig, Knight of the Most Honorable order of the Bath Captain General and Governor in and over the Provinces of Lower Canada, Upper Canada, Nova Scotia, new Brunswick, and their Several dependancies &c &c &c
The Memorial of the undersigned Inhabitants of the Town of Kingston in the Province of Upper Canada.

Humbly Sheweth

That sometimes in the year 1783 and before this Town was laid out, Mayor Ross then Commanding Officer at this place built an house to serve as a temporary Hospital, which is now Opposite Lot number five in the Town Plot-
That this building has been occasionally used as an Hospital, which has made it become a very great Nuisance not only to the Inhabitants living near it, but to the Inhabitants Generally.
That for some time past it has been made use of principally as an Hospital for the Seamen, few or no Soldiers having been sent to it.
That it appears to be in agitation to inclose a piece of ground round it, in order to continue its use as an Hospital.
That there can be no immediate communication from it with the water, the water Lot owned by John Macaulay being in its front, and Store house built upon it.
That there is a much more convenient and healthy place for an Hospital for Seamen on Point Frederick, and which is contiguous to their Vessels and Barracks.
That there is also a convenient and healthy place On the Kingston side for an Hospital upon the Heights at the back of the Town and which overlooks the whole Town plott [sic]..
Your memorialists therefore Humbly Pray your Excellency would be pleased to direct that the Hospital be removed to either of these places,29 or at such other place, at some distance from the Town as your Excellency in your Judgement may deem meet, and your Memorialists As in duty bound will every pray.
[List of 44 names including] … Fredk Bush41


29 - A Naval hospital built of stone came into use on Point Frederick during the War of 1812. The building, much altered, is now the residence of the Commandant of the Royal Military College.
41 - Frederick Bush was constable for the crown in 1809. He had joined the masonic lodge in 1800.

*    *    *    *    *

The Parrish Register of Kingston Upper Canada 1785-1811. ed.A.H.Young, The British Whig Pub. Co. Ltd., 1921. All parenthetical remarks in braces { } are my own, all others are existing. Dates in braces are taken from the text.

[Record of Baptism]
p100
Bush, Mary -D. of Frederick* & Phebe(sic) Bush; Sp.- Thomas Plummer, Margaret Hoogh; July 13th {1800}
*Frederick Bush joined Lodge No.6 A.F. & A.M. in 1800 (History of Freemasonry in Canada) He was a constable for the town in 1809.

p101
Venton, John -S. of John & Mary Ann Venton; Sp.- Fredk & Phebe(sic) Bush; 25th [Decr.]. {1801}

p105
Bush, Elizabeth -D. of Frederick & Phoebe Bush; Sp.- Phil Pember & Wm. Ashley & his wife; [Feby] 21st {1802}

p109
Bush, Hannah -D. of Frederick & Ph(o)ebe Bush; Sp.- James Cannon, Sarah Cannon; Jany 1. {1804}

p115
Bush, John William -S. of Frederick Bush, Ph(o)ebe Bush; Sp.- John Siz, Elizabeth Siz; Augt 4th. {1805}

p116
Bailey, Ann -D. of John Bailey, Ann Bailey; Sp.- Frederick Bush, Phoebe Bush; [Jany] 26. {1806}

p121
Bush, John Henry -S. Of Frederick Bush, Phoebe Bush; Sp.- John Darly (Darley), Hannah Darly (Darley); 22d [Novr]. {1807}

p124
Bayman, Eliza -D. of James Bayman, Jane Bayman; Sp.- Frderick{sic}; Phebe(sic) Bush; 31 July {1808}

p132
Bush, Christina -D. of Frederick Bush, Phoebe Bush; Sp.- James Bayman, Jane Bayman; 25 [Feby] {1810}

Sp = Sponsor

*    *    *    *    *

Marriage Bonds of Ontario 1803-1834. T.B.Wilson, Lambertville, N.J., Hunterdon House, 1985.

p17
STRAUB, Jacob & Jane Thomson. b: John D. Fred’k Busch and Christopher Zimmers. 28 Sept 1815 at Kingston. w: John Cumming. [171]

[“b” is bondsmen, “w” is witness]

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Appendix B

Newspaper Articles

Articles from Kingston Newspapers 1817-1827

BROCK COPPERS
WHEREAS the multitude of coppers now in circulation, render it very inconvenient both for the buyers and the sellers. We, whose names are hereunto annexed, are determined to use our influence in putting a stop to their circulation as money: more especially, those designated by the appellation of General Brock, as there would be, without them, a sufficient number for the convenience of making change. Kingston being the only place, either in the country or town, in both the Provinces, where the Brock coppers are allowed to pass. Almost every traveller brings a heavy luggage with him from those places, where he can procure them for a trifle, and when he arrives here, exerts himself to pass them for money, to the great annoyance of the trading citizens of this town, and even to the labouring part of [illegible]; for the shop-keeper must take them, or else lose his custom; he must pass them again, or else they become of no worth to him; by which means the poor day labourer receives nothing but a bag of coppers for his toil and fatigues: he goes with them to the baker to solicit from him a little bread to satisfy the cravings of his nature; to relieve the hunger of his family; he there meets with a positive denial, (for the baker cannot buy flour with coppers,) and the poor half famished labourer returns home disappointed and chagrined, to pass the night supperless, amidst the cries of his half starved children. Considering all these things we are determined to take no more Brock coppers for money after the fifteenth instant…. Frederick Busch [4th name on the list of 47 names.]
Kingston, June 12, 1817.

Kingston Gazette June 17, 1817 Vol.VII No.3, p.3, col.5

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Casualty.] - It is with regret we have to mention the fate of an honest and good man, by the name of William Donnelly, late of the U.S. army, and formerly the state of Pennsylvania, who, at French Creek, was cut off, in the bloom of life, by the falling of a Tree, on Wednesday last.
It is requested that any person acquainted with the name of the town and county to which Mr.Donnelly belonged, would give their information to Mr.Frederick Busch, or to Wm.M.Gillespie, in order that his relatives may be informed of his melancholly[sic] fate.
N.B. It is requested that editors in the United States, would give the above an insertion.

Kingston Gazette May 26, 1818 Vol.VII No.52, p.3, col.4

 

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To ELIJAH BEACH, Surveyor of Roads, for the County of Frontenac.
SIR, We hereby give you notice, that at the Court of Sessions, to be holden at Kingston in and for the Midland District, on the second Tuesday of October instant, the subscribers, and others, will, for reasons which shall then and there be stated, oppose the acceptance of your Report for discontinuing the road lately laid out from the extremity of Store Street, to Samuel Abbot’s, in the Township of Kingston… Kingston, Oct. 5th, 1818… Fred. Busch…

Kingston Gazette Oct. 6, 1818 Vol.VIII No.19, p.3, col.4

 
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LETTERS remaining in the Post Office, at Kingston, on 5th day of October, 1818… Frederick Bush…

Kingston Gazette Oct. 13, 1818 Vol.VIII No.20, p.2, col.2

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LETTERS remaining in the Post Office, at Kingston, on 5th day of October, 1818… Frederick Bush…

Kingston Gazette Oct. 20, 1818 Vol.VIII No.21, p.1, col.1

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LETTERS remaining in the Post Office, at Kingston, on 5th day of October, 1818… Frederick Bush…

Kingston Gazette Oct. 27, 1818 Vol.VIII No.22, p.1, col.1

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LETTERS remaining in the Post Office at Kingston, on 5th April, 1819… Frederick Bush… JOHN MACAULAY, P.M.

The Kingston Chronicle Apr. 9, 1819 Vol.I No.15, p.3, col.4

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Public Entertainment.
The subscriber respectfully informs his friends and the Public, that he has rented the house lately occupied by Frederick Bush, where he now keeps a House of Public Entertainment, Sign of the Traveller’s Rest!
And hopes, by strict attention to the comforts and convenience of his customers, to merit a share of public patronage.
Edward Dunn. Good Yard and Stable. Kingston, Aug. 17th, 1820.

The Kingston Chronicle Aug.18, 1820 Vol.II No.33, p.3, col.5

   

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John McGuire, Begs to inform the inhabitants of Kingston that he has commenced Baking in the house formerly occupied by Mr.Bush in Market Street. Kingston, April 11, 1822.

The Kingston Chronicle April 12, 1822 Vol.IV No.15, p.3, col.5

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At a Town Meeting held at the Court House in the Town of Kingston on Monday the 3d day of January, 1825, the following persons were chosen and duly elected for the year… Roads Master for Wolf[sic] Island… Frederick Busch, West…

The Kingston Chronicle Jan. 7, 1825 Vol.VI No.XXVIII, p.3, col.3

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  Melancholy Accident.– We are sorry to learn that on Wednesday afternoon last [February 28], Mrs. Jacob SMITH, of Long [Wolfe] Island, and her daughter, a child of two years old, were drowned under the following circumstances:– It appears that Mr. Smith was about changing his residence to a place three miles further up the Island: and on the afternoon of Wednesday, Mrs. Smith, her two children, and her brother Wm. Bush[sic], proceeded on the ice in a sleigh, which contained several articles of furniture, to the new residence. In passing along the Batteau channel they came to bad ice, which giving way, the horses and sleigh got into the water; but Mrs. Smith succeeded in getting out with her children. She did not proceed far, however, when the ice gave way under her, and she and her little daughter sunk to rise no more. Bush, who ran to the assistance of his sister, with great difficulty was able to save one of the children, a little boy, who, we understand, is doing well. Mrs. Smith was daughter of Mr. Frederick Bush[sic], of Long Island; was about 26 years of age, and at the time of her death far advanced in pregnancy.

The Kingston Chronicle Mar. 2, 1827 Vol.VIII No.XXXV, p.3, col.3

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Appendix C

Public Records

The following is a land record for lot 109 in Kingston for Frederick Busch. Reel GS3949 of the Abstract Index for the City of Kingston found in SEM.28.10.1991.LET, p.2.

 PatentSept. 16, 1803 Crown to James Bayman   all
A122B&SAug. 7, 1806Oct. 29, 1806James Bayman & Wife to John Daniel Frederick Bush the SW part
E438MApr. 20, 1819Apr. 21, 1819John Daniel Frederick Bush to Lawrence Herchmer SW part
G900B&SMar. 7, 1823Mar. 8, 1823John Daniel Frederick Bush to Wm. Hayes SW part

[B&S - bargain & sale; M - mortgage]

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The following is from microfilm H1141 of the National Archives, Ottawa, volume 42 of the Heirs & Devisee records. p114. Provided by Linda Corupe, OGS.


I John Daniel Frederick Bush of the Town of Kingston in the County of Frontenac in the Midland District of the Province of Upper Canada Baker brother of the late John Christian William Bush of the Town of York do hereby give notice that I will claim before the honorable commissioner for ascertaining and securing titles of lands in the Home District at the setting which shall be holden next after fifteen days from the putting up of this Notice, the Lot number thirteen in the fifth Concession of the Township of Markham in the County of York in the Home District aforesaid. Containing by admeasurement Two hundred acres, be the same more or less: John Christian William Bush, being the original nominee.

York 26 April 1804

John Daniel Frederick Bush by his attorney
[signed] Sam. Heron

put up in my office
the 26 april 1804
Midland C.O.
& [illegible]

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Land Petitions of Upper Canada, 1763-1865 (online – http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng)

Surname Given Name(s) Place Year Volume Bundle Petition Reference Microfilm 
BUSHFrederickYork179831B 494RG 1 L3C-1620

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The following is Phoebe Busch’s Land Grant for being the daughter of a United Empire Loyalist taken from a photocopy of a microfilm of the Orders in Council, Government of Upper Canada, 1807. Upper Canada Land Petitions, The Public Archives of Canada, RG1 L3, Volume 35 B8/84, Reel C-1622. Supplied by Susan E. MacDonald, Hamilton.

To His Excellency Frances Gow Esquire Lieutenant Governor of His Majestys Province of Upper Canada [illegible]. In Council The Petition of Phoebe Bush [sic] of the Town of Kingston in the Midland District. Wife of Frederic Bush [sic] of the same place, Baker.
Humbly Sheweth- That Your Petitioner is the daughter of Lewis Mosure, an U.E. Loyalist, late of the District of Ernestown but now of this District and is married to Frederic Bush of the Town of Kingston, Baker. That Your Petitioner has never received any lands or order for lands from the Crown.
Your Petitioner therefore humbly prays Excellency [illegible] be pleased to grant her two hundred acres of the Waste lands of the Crown, and permit N[illegible] Hindeman[illegible] of the Town of York, [illegible] to [illegible] the same and take out the Deed when completed, and Your Excellency Petition [illegible] duly [illegible] will [illegible] pray
[signed] Phoebe Bush
Kingston ninth of April 1807

[Page2]
Phoebe Bush maketh Oath and saith that She is the Person she describes herself to be in the written Petition. That she is married to Frederic Bush of the Town of Kingston, Baker, and has never received any Land or Order for Land from the Crown.
[signed] Phoebe Bush

Sworn before Me at
Kingston this 9th day
of April 1807
[signed] Thomas Marchland J.P.

I do hereby Certify that Phoebe Bush signed this written Petition in my presence. That she is the person she therein describes herself to be and she never received any Lands or order for Land from the Crown, to the best of my knowledge and [illegible] Witness My hand at Kingston in the Province of Upper Canada this Ninth day of April 1807
[signed] Thomas Marchland J.P.

[Page 3]
Phoebe Bush Rec from M Hindeman 30 June 1807 [illegible signature]
Govt Office York 30th June 1807- Referred to the Executive Council By order of the Lieut Governor [illegible signature] Secretary
The name of Lewis Mosher not Mosure, of the Eastern District appears on the UE List.
It does not appear that the Petitioner has any Land by order in Council – [illegible signature]
Read in Council July 4th 1807. The Petitoner recommended for 200 acres of Land as Daughter of a UE. Approved [illegible]
[signed] Thos Scott Chairman
[illegible] P.53 [illegible] 7 July 1807

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Found at http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/m/a/r/Steve-D-Marshall/GENE3-0001.html?Welcome=1065883748

BARGAIN & SALE - 18 November 1807 - John Daniel Frederick Bush of the Town of Kingston, Baker of one part and John Size of the Town of Kingston, Inn Keeper of the second part. For the consideration of 75 pounds, conveys Lot 13, concession 5 of the Township of Markham, County of York, Home District, containing 200 acres. Witnesses Allan MacLean & Benjamin Littlefield (signed) JDF Busch.

BARGAIN & SALE - January 1820 - Frederick Busch of the Town of Kingston, Yeoman of one part and John Size of The Town of York, Home District, Yeoman of the second part. For the consideration of 50 pounds, conveys Lot 14, Concession 5 of the Township of Markham, County of York, Home District, containing 200 acres. Witnesses Allan MacLean & Philip F. Hall, both Kingston (signed) Fred Busch

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Minutes of the Court of Quarter Sessions of the Peace of the Mecklenburg/Midland District [Counties of Frontenac, Lennox & Addington, Hastings and Prince Edward] Vol.1 1789 to 1790, 1794 to 1804, 1807 to 1816. Linda Corupe, transcribed & ed., Kingston, Linda Corupe, 2001.

p186
“[26th April, 1809] The following persons are nominated constables for the ensuing year:… Frederick Bush… Town of Kingston”

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Upper Canadian Justice: Early Assize Court Records (Court of Oyer & Terminer) of Ontario, Vol.1 1792 to 1809 Linda Corupe, transcribed & ed., Kingston, Linda Corupe, 2004.

pp180-1
At a Court of Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol Delivery held at Kingston in and for the Midland District, on Monday, the twenty-second day of September, 1806
The Grand Jury return the following bill against Patrick Ervan for attempting to persuade a soldier to desert.
CASE The King vs. Patrick Ervan
CHARGE attempting to persuade a soldier to desert
PETIT JURY… 12. Frederick Bush…
VERDICT guilty…

pp181-3
Tuesday, September 23rd, 1806
CASE The King vs. Antoine Secord, Pierre Govion and John Mercier
CHARGE stealing two watches privily from the person
PETIT JURY… 10. Frederick Bush…
VERDICT Antoine Secord and John Mercier not guilty. Pierre Govion guilty of larceny…

pp200-1
Tuesday, [the] 18th [day of] August, 1807
Court met pursuant to adjournment. Present: the same Judges.
CASE The King vs. John Weir
CHARGE grand larceny
PETIT JURY… 5. Frederick Bush…
VERDICT guilty of grand larceny…

CASE The King vs. Peter Gunsolus
CHARGE misdemeanour
PETIT JURY… 2. Frederick Bush…
VERDICT not guilty

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Notes

1. William Berczy Co-founder of Toronto (Toronto: Borough of York, 1967), pp.22,23.
 

2. John Andre, Infant Toronto as Simcoe’s Folly (Toronto: Centennial Press, 1971), pp.202 & 213, n.201. “Signature of Markham peasants from 1793 in Williamsburg, New York.” Handwritten signatures indentifies their mark “X”; p.207. n.50 “Original signatures of German settlers… The Public Archives of Canada, William Berczy Papers (M.G. 23, H II, 6, Volume 1, pp. 50, 51).”

3. Heirs & Devisee records (National Archives, Ottawa) Microfilm H1141, Vol.42, pp113-113a. Johann Daniel Friedrich Busch was christened August 17, 1773; Johann Christian Wilhelm Busch was christened February 6, 1767.        
Click images to enlarge or download pdf

4. The list of passengers on board the Catharina includes “Busch and brother”. Found in Pennsylvania German Pioneers: A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808. Vol.III. Ralph B. Strassberger, ed. William J. Hinke (Norristown, PA: Pennsylvania Historical Society Pub., 1934), p.50.
Bob Shank, “Some Berczy Settlers” in Berczy Settlers Gazette, Fall 1992, Vol.1, No.2, p.5.
Also, William Berczy, pp.24,50 “[The] group of 86 persons on board the ‘Henry and George’ consisted mainly of larger families, while the young men and single girl ‘servants’ sailed with the ‘Catharina.’”

5. William Berczy, pp.25-7.

6. Ibid., p.29.

7. Ibid., p.29.

8. Ibid., p.30.

9. Ibid., p.50.

10. Ibid., p.29.

11. Ibid., p.34.

12. Ibid.

13. Infant Toronto, p.21.

14. Ibid., pp.17-21.

15. Lieutenant-colonel Joseph Bouchette, as quoted in Toronto A Pictorial Record (Montreal: Dev-Sco Pub. Ltd. nd), p.vii, from Bouchette’s Topographical Description of the Province of Lower Canada, with remarks upon Upper Canada.

16. Infant Toronto, p.38; The German Company reference is found on pages 40 & 41.

17. Ibid., p.191, Appendix V.

18. Ibid., p.51.

19. William Berczy, p.44.

20. Ibid.

21. Infant Toronto, p.129. After the references to their working at the German company and receiving the land grants, all the records of the name Busch refer to one person only and not the “Busches” or the “Busch brothers.” The census appears in The Town of York 1793-1815: A Collection of Documents of Early Toronto (Toronto: The Champlain Society, 1962) by Edith Firth, pp.89,90.
Heirs & Devisee, pp114.

22. William Berczy, p.51. Infant Toronto, pp. 96,130.

23. Susan E. MacDonald MS, SEM.30.9.1991.MS., p.1, in my possesion as are other SEMs noted herein.

24. SEM.28.10.1991.MS, p.1, wherein Ms.MacDonald refers to a land transaction record for Frederick Busch at York dated January 2, 1798. William Berczy, p.154 n.177, “In 1799 York inhabitants included seven of Berczy’s settlers: Pining,… Matchefsky…” Frederick probably would have been included in this list of inhabitants of York if he was still living there since his name had appeared before in short list of prominant tradesmen and particularly alongside Pining and Matchefsky. The Parish Register of Kingston Upper Canada 1785-1811 (nl: The British Whig Pub. Co. Ltd., 1921), p.100, The record of Baptism of Mary Busch, the youngest child of Frederick Busch and Phoebe Mosier, is July 13, 1800, at Kingston, which would indicate that he was probably in Kingston around the middle of 1799 at the latest.

25. Infant Toronto, p.130.

26. A.M.Macher, The Story of Old Kingston (Toronto: The Musson Book Co., 1908), pp.74,266.

27. SEM.30.9.1991.MS., p.1.

28. Ibid.

29. J.Ross Robertson, The History of Freemasonry in Canada: From Its Introduction in 1749 (Toronto: The Hunter, Ross Co. Ltd., 1899), pp.588,601.

30. R.A.Preston,ed., Kingston Before the War of 1812 (nl: The Champlain Society, 1959), p.280b.

31. SEM.28.10.1991.LET., p.2, wherein Ms.MacDonald reports the source as the Abstract Index for the City of Kingston, Reel GS3949 for lot 109.

32. Upper Canada Land Petitions, The Public Archives of Canada, RG1 L3, Volume 35 B8/84, Reel C-1622. From a photocopy supplied by Susan E. MacDonald.

33. SEM.30.9.1991.LET., p.2, wherein Ms.MacDonald refers to an article by a Dr.Burleigh of Queen’s University.

34. Bargain and Sale for lot 13, concession 5 of the Township of Markham between John Daniel Frederick Bush and John Size dated November 18, 1807. Sold for 75 pounds. Witnessed by Allan MacLean and Benjamin Littlefield. Source found at Steve Marshall Family Tree.

35. The Story of Old Kingston, pp.81,101.

36. Kingston Gazette June 17, 1817 Vol.VII No.3, p.3, col.5.

37. Linda Corupe, transcribed & ed.,Upper Canadian Justice: Early Assize Court Records (Court of Oyer & Terminer) of Ontario, Vol.1 1792 to 1809 (Kingston: Linda Corupe, 2004), pp180-183, 200.

38. Linda Corupe, transcribed & ed., Minutes of the Court of Quarter Sessions of the Peace of the Mecklenburg/Midland District [Counties of Frontenac, Lennox & Addington, Hastings and Prince Edward] Vol.1 1789 to 1790, 1794 to 1804, 1807 to 1816 (Kingston: Linda Corupe, 2001), p.186. Also, Kingston Before the War of 1812, p.354 n.41.

39. The Story of Old Kingston, p.161.

40. Kingston News, Wednesday, March 23, 1864. Found at The Islands website - George Briggs

41. Bargain and Sale for lot 14, concession 5 of the Township of Markham between Frederick Bush and John Size dated January, 1820. Sold for 50 pounds. Witnessed by Allan MacLean and Philip F. Hall. Source found at Steve Marshall Family Tree.

42. Bakery notice found at The Kingston Chronicle, April 12, 1822 vol.IV, no.15, p.3, col.5. Land sale found at SEM.28.10.1991.LET, p.2, wherein Ms.MacDonald reports the source as the Abstract Index of the City of Kingston, Reel GS3949 for lot 109.

43. Wallace G. Breck, “The Le Moynes: Longueuil, Kingston and Wolfe Island,” in Historic Kingston No.37 1989, ed. D.A.Redmond (Kingston: Kingston Historical Society, 1989), p.37, wherein he indicates as his source: H.C.Burleigh, Forgotten Leaves of Canadian History (Kingston: Brown & Martin, 1973).

44. Winston M.Cosgrove, Wolfe Island Past and Present (nl: W.M. Cosgrove, 1973), p.8.

45. The Kingston Chronicle, January 7, 1825 vol.VI, no.XXVIII, p.3, col.3.

46. Obituary of Elizabeth Busch Smith found in The Upper Canada Gazette. York, U.C., March 10, 1827.

47. The Kingston Chronicle, March 2, 1827 vol.VIII, no.XXXV, p.3, col.3.

48. Registers 1821-1869, St.Andrews Presbyterian Church, Kingston, Ontario. (Kingston: O.G.S. Kingston Branch, 1982) Section 2, p.3.

49. E.C.Guillet, Early Life in Upper Canada (nl: The Ontario Publishing Co. Ltd., nd), p.179.

50. SEM.30.9.1991.MS., pp.2,3. Frontenac County Cemetaries (Kingston: O.G.S. Kingston, 1986), record #150.

51. SEM.30.9.1991.MS., p.2.

52. Russ Waller, RABBITS: (3): A Marital Network File of Original Settlers in 1784 of Frontenac, Lennox & Addington Counties in Eastern Ontario (Kingston: Walrus Press, 1987), p.98.

53. SEM.30.9.1991.MS., p.2.

54. Small & Collins, Wolfe Island Township, Y.Horne Cemetary & Point Alexandria U.C. Cemetary (Kingston, 1973) in Frontenac County Cemetaries (Kingston: O.G.S. Kingston, 1986), record #22.

55. It is probably his signature, rather than his son Frederick's, that appears on the petition to the governor general dated September 26, 1842. This was in response to a petition by John Mosier to be granted title to Pigeon Island. See Pigeon Island requests & Petitions Against. A petition to the governor general is mostly likely to have been signed by leading citizens.
There is a possible signature (transcribed) of Frederick on a petition to the Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada dated August 25, 1836. The signature is recorded as “T.D.[Jacob] B[us]ch” (the corrections in square brackets are original to this source) may be J.D.Busch (i.e., John Daniel [Frederick]). See Petition from Freeholders and Inhabitants of Wolfe Island, 1836 NAC Upper Canada Land Petitions, RG 1, L 3, vol. 535, W20/21, microfilm C-2959 Found at Gemmell family website.
The most certain date is 1833 where his name appears on a land transaction for the sale of the Loughborough Township property.

56. SEM.30.9.1991.MS., p.3.

57. SEM.28.10.1991.LET., pp.3,4, wherein Ms.MacDonald reports the source as John Busch’s entry in the Wolfe Island census of 1871.

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Sources

Berczy Settlers Gazette. Markham Berczy Settlers Association. Markham, ON.

Linda Corupe, OGS.

Death Notices of Ontario. W.D.Reid, New Jersey, Hunterdon House, 1980.

Directory of the Province of Ontario 1857. T.B.Wilson & E.S.Wilson, New Jersey, Hunterdon House, 1987.

Early Life in Upper Canada. E.C.Guillet, The Ontario Publishing Co. Ltd.

Frontenac County Cemetaries. Kingston, O.G.S. Kingston, 1986.

The History of Freemasonry in Canada: From Its Introduction in 1749. J.Ross Robertson, Toronto, The Hunter, Ross Co. Ltd., 1899, Volume 1. Available at
Archive.org

Infant Toronto as Simcoe’s Folly. John Andre, Toronto, Centennial Press, 1971.

Kingston Before the War of 1812. ed.R.A.Preston, The Champlain Society, 1959.

The Kingston Chronicle.

Kingston Chronicle & Gazette.

Kingston Gazette.

Kingston News.

The Loyalists In Ontario: The Sons and Daughters of The American Loyalists of Upper Canada. W.D.Reid, New Jersey, Hunterdon House 1973.

Susan E. MacDonald, Hamilton, Ontario.

Marriage Bonds of Ontario 1803-1834. T.B.Wilson, New Jersey, Hunterdon House, 1985.

Minutes of the Court of Quarter Sessions of the Peace of the Mecklenburg/Midland District [Counties of Frontenac, Lennox & Addington, Hastings and Prince Edward], Vol.1 1789 to 1790, 1794 to 1804, 1807 to 1816. Linda Corupe, transcribed & ed., Kingston, Linda Corupe, 2001.

The Parrish Register of Kingston Upper Canada 1785-1811. ed.A.H.Young, The British Whig Pub. Co. Ltd., 1921.

Pennsylvania German Pioneers: A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808. 3 vol. Ralph B. Strassberger. ed. William J. Hinke, Norristown PA, Pennsylvania Historical Society Pub., 1934.

RABBITS: (3): A Marital Network File of Original Settlers in 1784 of Frontenac, Lennox & Addington Counties in Eastern Ontario. Russ Waller, Kingston, Walrus Press, 1987.

Registers 1821.1869, St.Andrews Presbyterian Church, Kingston, Ontario. Kingston, O.G.S. Kingston Branch, 1982.

Register of Funerals or Burials in St.Georges Burial Ground.

Toronto A Pictorial Record. Montreal, Dev-Sco Pub. Ltd., nd.

The Town of York 1793-1815: A Collection of Documents of Early Toronto. Edith G. Firth, Toronto, The Champlain Society, 1962.

Upper Canada Land Petitions. The Public Archives of Canada.

Upper Canadian Justice: Early Assize Court Records (Court of Oyer & Terminer) of Ontario, Vol.1 1792 to 1809. Linda Corupe, transcribed & ed., Kingston, Linda Corupe, 2004.

William Berczy. Florence M. Burns, Don Mills, Fitzhenry & Whiteside Ltd., 1977.

William Berczy Co-founder of Toronto. John Andre, Toronto, Borough of York, 1967.

Wolfe Island 1851 Census Rebuilt & Indexed. Russ Waller, Kingston, Walrus Press, 1988.

Wolfe Island Past and Present. Winston M. Cosgrove, nl, W.M.Cosgrove, 1973.


LINKS:
City of Markham - William Moll Berczy
City of Markham - The Berczy Settlers
Markham Berczy Settlers Association

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